Hamuelz




Ask me anything
asapfergg:

trap lord

asapfergg:

trap lord

Source: asapfergg

just-breezy:

Bergkristall
by fr4dd

just-breezy:

Bergkristall

by fr4dd

Source: flickr.com

mistafuckingbooty:

at first i was like: dude, how big is your cat?!

mistafuckingbooty:

at first i was like: dude, how big is your cat?!

Source: bestlols

poyzn:

Quick and simple lifehacks.

Source: poyzn

Source: ladyshawsters

alcyere:

Stars over Freeman Lake (by justinmullet)

alcyere:

Stars over Freeman Lake (by justinmullet)

minecraftserverfinder:

Candy mountain, Charlie! - more at http://ift.tt/1a7N3av

minecraftserverfinder:

Candy mountain, Charlie! - more at http://ift.tt/1a7N3av

Source: doloresjaneumbridge

jtotheizzoe:

The oldest living thing in the world: These actinobacteria, recovered from the subterranean brrrrr-osphere that is Siberian permafrost, are estimated to be 500,000 years old. While many ancient microbes have been revived from ancient dormant states, these bacterial cells have been continuously living for half a million years. It’s known that the bacteria aren’t mobile in the frozen Earth, so by radioactively dating the layers of soil around the microbes, scientists were able to estimate their age.
Unable to divide and reproduce, these microbes were shown to be actively repairing their DNA despite the frigid temperatures, their enzymes uniquely adapted to an environment that would mean certain death for perhaps every other creature on Earth. While not growing, moving, or reproducing, this sort of cryostasis counts as living if you ask me (and the scientists who study them).
What do you think this means for the possibility of life on other planets?
(via Rachel Sussman and Brain Pickings. Check out the original 2007 research paper here)

jtotheizzoe:

The oldest living thing in the world: These actinobacteria, recovered from the subterranean brrrrr-osphere that is Siberian permafrost, are estimated to be 500,000 years old. While many ancient microbes have been revived from ancient dormant states, these bacterial cells have been continuously living for half a million years. It’s known that the bacteria aren’t mobile in the frozen Earth, so by radioactively dating the layers of soil around the microbes, scientists were able to estimate their age.

Unable to divide and reproduce, these microbes were shown to be actively repairing their DNA despite the frigid temperatures, their enzymes uniquely adapted to an environment that would mean certain death for perhaps every other creature on Earth. While not growing, moving, or reproducing, this sort of cryostasis counts as living if you ask me (and the scientists who study them).

What do you think this means for the possibility of life on other planets?

(via Rachel Sussman and Brain Pickings. Check out the original 2007 research paper here)

Source: jtotheizzoe

carypm:

walkingfoxiest:

a post where I explain with images how foxes are the best thing ever, and how if you disagree you are obviously wrong

Is it possible to domesticate a fox I want one as a pet

Source: walkingfoxiest